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  • OUR PRODUCTS:
  • CHUTNEYS & RELISHES
  • SAUCES
  • JAMS & JELLIES
  • MUSTARDS &
    HORSERADISH
  • CHEESE JELLIES
  • MUSTARDS & HORSERADISH

    Traditions and history run deep in the military. No Mess was without a selection of mustards
    and horseradish at lunch and dinner. Roast beef with mustard or horseradish, sausages with
    Dijon or seeded mustard – they’re traditions at home, and away. This range pays tribute to
    the fearless aviators and their famous aircraft.

    Mustards Horseradish

    Mustang Dijon Mustard

    Sleek in appearance, the North American Mustang’s performance outshone the majority of its contemporaries. It had far greater versatility than the Spitfire: it served as a long-range fighter, as a fighter-bomber, a dive-bomber, flew close support and photo reconnaissance. It was the real all- rounder and helped ensure Allied air superiority from early 1944.

     

    Lancaster Seeded Mustard

    Flying and crewing an Avro Lancaster was not for the faint of heart. It was cramped, uncomfortable and dangerous. The achievements of the ‘Lanc’ and the brave men of Bomber Command who flew it have been widely acclaimed. First flown in 1941, the Lancaster proved itself not only as the finest British bomber of WW2, but also as one of the most successful aircraft of all time.

     

    Hurricane Horseradish

    Undeservedly the Hawker Hurricane’s reputation is somewhat overshadowed by the Spitfire, but the Hurricane’s role in the Battle of Britain was legendary. A single-seater fighter plane, it was the first low-wing monoplane with a retractable under-carriage. Slippery and efficient in the air, it shot down more enemy aircraft than all other UK air and ground crew defences combined.

     

    Spitfire Hot English Mustard

    Grown men still go weak at the knees at the sound of the Rolls Royce Merlin engines of the Supermarine Spitfire. It’s a plane that gets hearts racing just sitting on a tarmac. Its graceful lines, near perfect handling and eight-gun punch made the ‘Spit’ a legend in the hands of the pilots of Fighter Command. Still legendary today, it remains the symbol of the Battle of Britain.